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SQL JOINS on HR Database: Display the first and last name and salary for those employees who earn less than the employee earn whose number is 182

SQL JOINS on HR Database: Exercise-7 with Solution

7. From the following table, write a SQL query to find those employees who earn less than the employee of ID 182. Return first name, last name and salary.

Sample table: employees


Sample Solution:

SELECT E.first_name, E.last_name, E.salary 
  FROM employees E 
   JOIN employees S
     ON E.salary < S.salary 
      AND S.employee_id = 182;

Sample Output:

first_name	last_name	salary
James		Landry		2400.00
Steven		Markle		2200.00
TJ		Olson		2100.00
Ki		Gee		2400.00
Hazel		Philtanker	2200.00

Relational Algebra Expression:

Relational Algebra Expression: Display the first and last name and salary for those employees who earn less than the employee earn whose number is 182.

Relational Algebra Tree:

Relational Algebra Tree: Display the first and last name and salary for those employees who earn less than the employee earn whose number is 182.

Pictorial Presentation:

SQL Exercises: Display the first and last name and salary for those employees who earn less than the employee earn whose number is 182

Practice Online


HR database model

Query Visualization:

Duration:

Query visualization of Display the first and last name and salary for those employees who earn less than the employee earn whose number is 182 - Duration

Rows:

Query visualization of Display the first and last name and salary for those employees who earn less than the employee earn whose number is 182 - Rows

Cost:

Query visualization of Display the first and last name and salary for those employees who earn less than the employee earn whose number is 182 - Cost

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Previous: From the following table, write a SQL query to find all departments including those without any employee. Return first name, last name, department ID, department name.
Next: From the following table, write a SQL query to find the employees and their managers. Return the first name of the employee and manager.

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SQL: Tips of the Day

MYSQL OR vs IN performance:

In many database servers, IN() is just a synonym for multiple OR clauses, because the two are logically equivalent. Not so in MySQL, which sorts the values in the IN() list and uses a fast binary search to see whether a value is in the list. This is O(Log n) in the size of the list, whereas an equivalent series of OR clauses is O(n) in the size of the list (i.e., much slower for large lists)

Ref: https://bit.ly/3PzLY69