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JavaScript: Perform left-to-right function composition for asynchronous functions

JavaScript fundamental (ES6 Syntax): Exercise-166 with Solution

Write a JavaScript program to perform left-to-right function composition for asynchronous functions.

  • Use Array.prototype.reduce() and the spread operator (...) to perform function composition using Promise.prototype.then().
  • The functions can return a combination of normal values, Promises or be async, returning through await.
  • All functions must accept a single argument.

Sample Solution:

JavaScript Code:

//#Source https://bit.ly/2neWfJ2 
const pipeAsyncFunctions = (...fns) => arg => fns.reduce((p, f) => p.then(f), Promise.resolve(arg));
const sum = pipeAsyncFunctions(
  x => x + 1,
  x => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(() => resolve(x + 2), 1000)),
  x => x + 3,
  async x => (await x) + 4
);
(async () => {
  console.log(await sum(5)); // 15 (after one second)
})();

Sample Output:

15

Flowchart:

flowchart: Perform left-to-right function composition for asynchronous functions

Live Demo:

See the Pen javascript-fundamental-exercise-166 by w3resource (@w3resource) on CodePen.


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JavaScript: Tips of the Day

Checking if a key exists in a JavaScript object?

Checking for undefined-ness is not an accurate way of testing whether a key exists. What if the key exists but the value is actually undefined?

var obj = { key: undefined };
obj["key"] !== undefined // false, but the key exists!

You should instead use the in operator:

"key" in obj // true, regardless of the actual value

If you want to check if a key doesn't exist, remember to use parenthesis:

!("key" in obj) // true if "key" doesn't exist in object
!"key" in obj   // ERROR!  Equivalent to "false in obj"

Or, if you want to particularly test for properties of the object instance (and not inherited properties), use hasOwnProperty:

obj.hasOwnProperty("key") // true

Checking for undefined-ness is not an accurate way of testing whether a key exists. What if the key exists but the value is actually undefined? var obj = { key: undefined }; obj["key"] !== undefined // false, but the key exists! You should instead use the in operator: "key" in obj // true, regardless of the actual value If you want to check if a key doesn't exist, remember to use parenthesis: !("key" in obj) // true if "key" doesn't exist in object !"key" in obj // ERROR! Equivalent to "false in obj" Or, if you want to particularly test for properties of the object instance (and not inherited properties), use hasOwnProperty: obj.hasOwnProperty("key") // true For performance comparison between the methods that are in, hasOwnProperty and key is undefined.

Ref: https://bit.ly/2CFNp1X