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C Programming: Count all the numbers with unique digits in a range

C Programming Mathematics: Exercise-30 with Solution

Write a C program that accepts a number (n) and counts all numbers with unique digits of length x within a specified range.

Range: 0 <= x < 10n

Example:
When n = 1, numbers with unique digits (10) between 0 and 9 are 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
When n = 2, numbers with unique digits (91) between 0 and 100 are 0,1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15 …..99 except 11, 22, 33, 44, 55, 66, 77, 88 and 99.

Test Data:
(1) -> 10
(2) -> 91

Sample Solution:

C Code:

#include <stdio.h>

int min(int a, int b){
    return (a > b) ? b : a;
}
int test(int n) {
  if(n == 0)
  return 1;
      n = min(10, n);
      if(n == 1)
	  return 10;
      int flag = 9;
      int result = 10;
      for(int i = 2; i<= n; i++){
         flag *= (9 - i + 2);
         result += flag;
      }
      return result;
   }

int main(void) {
  int n = 1;
  printf("n = %d",n);
  printf("\nNumbers with unique digits in the range 0, 10: %d", test(n));
  n = 2;
  printf("\n\nn = %d",n);
  printf("\nNumbers with unique digits in the range 0, 100: %d", test(n));
  n = 3;
  printf("\n\nn = %d",n);
  printf("\nNumbers with unique digits in the range 0, 1000: %d", test(n));
}

Sample Output:

n = 1
Numbers with unique digits in the range 0, 10: 10

n = 2
Numbers with unique digits in the range 0, 100: 91

n = 3
Numbers with unique digits in the range 0, 1000: 739

Flowchart:

Flowchart: Count all the numbers with unique digits in a range

C Programming Code Editor:

Improve this sample solution and post your code through Disqus.

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C Programming: Tips of the Day

What's the point of const pointers?

const is a tool which you should use in pursuit of a very important C++ concept:

Find bugs at compile-time, rather than run-time, by getting the compiler to enforce what you mean.

Even though it does not change the functionality, adding const generates a compiler error when you're doing things you didn't mean to do. Imagine the following typo:

void foo(int* ptr)
{
    ptr = 0;// oops, I meant *ptr = 0
}

If you use int* const, this would generate a compiler error because you're changing the value to ptr. Adding restrictions via syntax is a good thing in general. Just don't take it too far -- the example you gave is a case where most people don't bother using const.

Ref : https://bit.ly/33Cdn3Q