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NumPy: DateTime Exercises, Practice, Solution

NumPy DateTime [7 exercises with solution]

[An editor is available at the bottom of the page to write and execute the scripts.]

1. Write a NumPy program to display all the dates for the month of March, 2017. Go to the editor
Expected Output:
March, 2017
['2017-03-01' '2017-03-02' '2017-03-03' '2017-03-04' '2017-03-05'
'2017-03-06' '2017-03-07' '2017-03-08' '2017-03-09' '2017-03-10'
'2017-03-11' '2017-03-12' '2017-03-13' '2017-03-14' '2017-03-15'
'2017-03-16' '2017-03-17' '2017-03-18' '2017-03-19' '2017-03-20'
'2017-03-21' '2017-03-22' '2017-03-23' '2017-03-24' '2017-03-25'
'2017-03-26' '2017-03-27' '2017-03-28' '2017-03-29' '2017-03-30'
'2017-03-31']
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2. Write a NumPy program to get the dates of yesterday, today and tomorrow. Go to the editor
Sample Output:
Yestraday: 2017-03-24
Today: 2017-03-25
Tomorrow: 2017-03-26
Click me to see the sample solution

3. Write a NumPy program to count the number of days of specific month. Go to the editor
Expected Output:
Number of days, February, 2016:
29 days
Number of days, February, 2017:
28 days
Number of days, February, 2018:
28 days
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4. Write a NumPy program to create 24 python datetime.datetime objects (single object for every hour), and then put it in a numpy array. Go to the editor
Expected Output:
[datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 0, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 1, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 2, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 3, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 4, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 5, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 6, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 7, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 8, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 9, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 10, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 11, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 12, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 13, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 14, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 15, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 16, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 17, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 18, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 19, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 20, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 21, 0)
datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 22, 0) datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 23, 0)]
Click me to see the sample solution

5. Write a NumPy program to find the first Monday in May 2017. Go to the editor
Expected Output:
First Monday in May 2017:
2017-05-01
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6. Write a NumPy program to find the number of weekdays in March 2017. Go to the editor
Note: "busday" default of Monday through Friday being valid days.
Sample Output:
Number of weekdays in March 2017:
23
Click me to see the sample solution

7. Write a NumPy program to convert numpy datetime64 to Timestamp. Go to the editor
Sample output:
Current date:
2017-04-01 08:01:12.722055
Timestamp:
1491033672.72
UTC from Timestamp:
2017-04-01 08:01:12.722055
Click me to see the sample solution

Python Code Editor:

More to Come !

Do not submit any solution of the above exercises at here, if you want to contribute go to the appropriate exercise page.



Python: Tips of the Day

Python: Annotated Assignment Statement

This might not seem as impressive as some other tricks but it's a new syntax that was introduced to Python in recent years and just good to be aware of.

Annotated assignments allow the coder to leave type hints in the code. These don't have any enforcing power at least not yet. It's still nice to be able to imply some type hints and definitely offers more options than only being able to comment regarding expected types of variables.

day: str = 'Monday'
print(day)
lst: list = [1,2,3,4]
print(lst)

Output:

Monday
[1, 2, 3, 4]

Or the same thing in a shorter way:

day= 'Monday' #str
print(day)
lst= [1,2,3,4] # list
print(lst)

Output:

Monday
[1, 2, 3, 4]