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Python print() function

print() function

The print statement has been replaced with a print() function, with keyword arguments to replace most of the special syntax of the old print statement.

The print statement can be used in the following ways :

  • print("Good Morning")
  • print("Good", <Variable Containing the String>)
  • print("Good" + <Variable Containing the String>)
  • print("Good %s" % <variable containing the string>)

In Python, single, double and triple quotes are used to denote a string. Most use single quotes when declaring a single character. Double quotes when declaring a line and triple quotes when declaring a paragraph/multiple lines.

Commands

print(<el_1>, ..., sep=' ', end='\n', file=sys.stdout, flush=False)
  • Use 'file=sys.stderr' for errors.
  • Use 'flush=True' to forcibly flush the stream.

Pretty Print

from pprint import pprint
pprint(<collection>, width=80, depth=None)
  • Levels deeper than 'depth' get replaced by '...'.

Double Quotes Use:

Example:

print("Python is very simple language")

Output:

Python is very simple language

Single Quotes Use:

Example:

print('Hello')

Output:

Hello

Triple Quotes Use:

Example:

print("""Python is very popular language.
It is also friendly language.""")

Output:

Python is very Popular Language.
It is also friendly language.

Variable Use:

Strings can be assigned to variable say string1 and string2 which can called when using the print statement.

Example:

str1 = 'Wel'
print(str1,'come') 

Output:

Wel come

Example:

str1 = 'Welcome'
str2 = 'Python'
print(str1, str2)

Output:

Welcome Python

String Concatenation:

String concatenation is the "addition" of two strings. Observe that while concatenating there will be no space between the strings.

Example:

str1 = 'Python'
str2 = ':'
print('Welcome' + str1 + str2)

Output:

WelcomePython:

Using as String:

%s is used to refer to a variable which contains a string.

Example:

str1 = 'Python'
print("Welcome %s" % str1)

Output:

Welcome Python

Using other data types:

Similarly, when using other data types

  • %d -> Integer
  • %e -> exponential
  • %f -> Float
  • %o -> Octal
  • %x -> Hexadecimal

This can be used for conversions inside the print statement itself.

Using as Integer:

Example:

print("Actual Number = %d" %15)

Output:

Actual Number = 15

Using as Exponential:

Example:

print("Exponential equivalent of the number = %e" %15)

Output:

Exponential equivalent of the number = 1.500000e+01

Using as Float:

Example:

print("Float of the number = %f" %15)

Output:

Float of the number = 15.000000

Using as Octal:

Example:

print("Octal equivalent of the number = %o" %15)

Output:

Octal equivalent of the number = 17

Using as Hexadecimal:

Example:

print("Hexadecimal equivalent of the number = %x" %15)

Output:

Hexadecimal equivalent of the number = f

Using multiple variables:

When referring to multiple variables parenthesis is used.

Example:

str1 = 'World'
str2 = ':'
print("Python %s %s" %(str1,str2))

Output:

Python World :

Other Examples of Print Statement:

The following are other different ways the print statement can be put to use.

Example-1:

% is used for %d type word

print("Welcome to %%Python %s" %'language')

Output:

Welcome to %Python language

Example-2:

\n is used for Line Break.

print("Sunday\nMonday\nTuesday\nWednesday\nThursday\nFriday\nSaturday")

Output:

Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

Example-3:

Any word print multiple times.

print('-w3r'*5)

Output:

-w3r-w3r-w3r-w3r-w3r

Example-4:

\t is used for tab.

print("""
Language:
\t1 Python
\t2 Java\n\t3 JavaScript
""")

Output:

Language:
        1 Python
        2 Java
        3 JavaScript

Precision Width and Field Width:

Field width is the width of the entire number and precision is the width towards the right. One can alter these widths based on the requirements.

The default Precision Width is set to 6.

Example-1:

Notice upto 6 decimal points are returned. To specify the number of decimal points, '%(fieldwidth).(precisionwidth)f' is used.

print("%f" % 5.1234567890)

Output:

5.123457

Example-2:

Notice upto 5 decimal points are returned

print("%.5f" % 5.1234567890)

Output:

5.12346

Example-3:

If the field width is set more than the necessary than the data right aligns itself to adjust to the specified values.

print("%9.5f" % 5.1234567890)

Output:

  5.12346

Example-4:

Zero padding is done by adding a 0 at the start of fieldwidth.

print("%015.5f" % 5.1234567890)

Output:

000000005.12346

Example-5:

For proper alignment, a space can be left blank in the field width so that when a negative number is used, proper alignment is maintained.

print("% 9f" % 5.1234567890)
print("% 9f" % -5.1234567890)

Output:

 5.123457
-5.123457

Example-6:

'+' sign can be returned at the beginning of a positive number by adding a + sign at the beginning of the field width.

print("%+9f" % 5.1234567890)
print("% 9f" % -5.1234567890)

Output:

+5.123457
-5.123457

Example-7:

As mentioned above, the data right aligns itself when the field width mentioned is larger than the actually field width. But left alignment can be done by specifying a negative symbol in the field width.

print("%-9.4f" % 5.1234567890)

Output:

5.1235   

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Python: Tips of the Day

Python: How do I concatenate two lists in Python?

You can use the + operator to combine them:

listone = [1,2,3]
listtwo = [4,5,6]

joinedlist = listone + listtwo

Output:

>>> joinedlist
[1,2,3,4,5,6]

Ref: https://bit.ly/2B8fL40